The Clarke 100

The 100: Why Clarke’s Ending Fits (And Why It Doesn’t Make Sense)

Clarke Griffin is a character in the American post-apocalyptic science fiction novel, The , written by Kass Morgan. From this novel, the television series, Los, was also created under The CW network.

Clarke was part of The, a group of juvenile delinquents and drug addicts from the Ark who were sent to Earth to kill. before being arrested.

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Clarke was part of The, a group of juvenile delinquents and drug addicts from the Ark who were sent to Earth to kill. before being arrested.

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Clarke: Nope, Lexa!! I love you! Lexa: I will always be europareportage.euse Instantiation (Part 2) Clarke and Lexa is the relationship between Clarke Griffin and Lexa.

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Clarke Griffin is a character in the American post-apocalyptic science fiction novel, The , written by Kass Morgan. From that novel.

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Los ending is incredibly divisive. As a result, whether or not surviving characters had satisfying endings to their narratives isn’t something everyone agrees on. Clarke Griffin, who was the leader at the center of the stories from the beginning, is one of those characters. Much about his ending is appropriate, but there are also aspects that don’t make sense.

What finally happens to Madi in the final season is horrible. Cadogan pokes at her brain for information on humanity’s final test and leaves her unable to move or communicate. That helps ease Clarke’s own pain at being separated from her daughter, and it makes sense that she would want better for Madi than for herself.

Although Clarke is only a teenager when the series begins, without thinking about the potential of a family, becoming a mother is something that changes her. Certainly, being a father is not everyone’s dream, but for Clarke it is very important. He wants Madi to have a chance for the future. When the first ones arrive on Earth, they are surprised to find the Grounders. The Grounders and Arkadians team up, only to discover that a prison ship has people who have been in cryo-sleep for years.

Clarke, who has never shied away from challenging the authority of any of the civilizations she has encountered, is the kind of character who would have asked those questions. Living on the Ark, he wonders what it would be like, draws pictures of how he imagines it, and takes Earth Skills as a class. For Clarke, the Earth is home. Bellamy, for example, dies before humanity makes its final test, so, despite his belief, it does not transcend.

They are the family that Clarke has built around her throughout the entire series. Not only does he rob Clarke of his best friend, but he also robs her of the chance to share the ultimate fate of humanity with him. Bellamy found faith and believed in transcendence, but never got a chance to say goodbye to Clarke.

Humanity still has a choice. Clarke, however, does not. Clarke thinks this is another case where she has to "put up with it so they don’t have to," but that’s not the case. She is not punished for all of humanity’s transgressions, only for her own. He walked into humanity’s final test with a gun and shot the test subject, after all.

When the entire series is about breaking humanity’s cycle of violence, Clarke’s final violent act on behalf of humanity cannot go unchecked. When humanity transcends, there is no pain, no death, no true freedom. The part of humanity that chooses to transcend becomes part of a kind of collective consciousness, as has happened with all civilizations that have passed this final test.

There, too, they were free from pain, their minds linked to the cognitive world of ALIE.

Clarke and Niylah 3×01